Women’s History Month: Wilma Rudolph

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March is Women’s History Month, and Total Woman is celebrating by posting interesting stories and tweets throughout the month about women you may or may not know about. Follow us on Twitter for interesting, quick “Did You Know” factoids, and stop by the blog often or subscribe to follow along. If there’s a woman you’d like to hear more about or think that people would want to read about, drop us a line in the comments!


Wilma Rudolph: The Fastest Woman in the World
Many people know Wilma Rudolph for her amazing achievements. She was the first American woman to win 3 gold medals in track and field during a single Olympic Games, despite running on a sprained ankle. That achievement is made all the more impressive when you take into account the fact that she was born prematurely weighing just 4.5 pounds,  suffered double pneumonia and scarlet fever, and was stricken with polio at age 4 and lost the use of her left leg.

We all strive for excellence, but it is rare for someone to achieve every goal that they pursue, especially if they have something impeding them from reaching their full potential. Wilma Rudolph didn’t let anything prevent her from achieving her goals and completing her dreams. She believed that if you have a dream that you believe strongly enough in, then nothing should stop you from accomplishing that dream.

For more on this amazing athlete, read this fantastic article on ESPN: Rudolph Ran and the World Went Wild. A great story about an even greater woman.

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Read more about the great Wilma Rudolph.

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